Southeast Asia Soy Buyers Tour Minnesota Farm

Participants in a trade mission from southeast Asia,  visiting an area crop and livestock operation,  now have a better understanding of U.S. agricultural products and soybean production practices thanks to a tour of the Mike Riley family farm near Amboy.

Organized by the U.S. Soybean Export Council (USSEC) in conjunction with the Minnesota Soybean Research & Promotion Council (MSR&PC), the Southeast Asia trade mission included 45 executives representing 37 companies from Thailand, Vietnam, Indonesia, Singapore, Philippines and Malaysia.

For the Riley family, this was the second time a trade delegation has spent time on their farm to learn more about crop and livestock production.

The stop at the Riley farm provided the delegation with a close look at the equipment necessary to harvest soybeans and to learn more the production practices the family follows on their operation.  The group was particularly interested in learning more about the cost of production, grain storage and the latest in machinery technology.  Riley and his wife Cathy, along with their sons, Dusty and Ross, their ag lender and crop insurance advisor took time to answer questions from the delegation.  The group also spent time at a hog nursery facility to learn more about swine production and diets.  

“The group was very curious about the soybean production in this part of the state as they had heard this area had been hit hard by frost a week or so ago, so they were curious as how that may affect our yields,” said Riley. “This group really seemed interested in our operation and what it takes to produce soybeans.  It was a privilege for our family to share our crop and livestock operation practices with them.”

According to USSEC Regional Director for Southeast Asia Timothy Loh, the group was eager to visit the Riley farm to learn more about Minnesota crop and livestock production agriculture.

“Many of the companies represented on this delegation are importers of U.S. agricultural products,” Loh said. “The annual import requirement for this group is approximately 3.7 million metric tons of soybean meal, 2.5 million metric tons of commodity grade soybeans, and 37,000 metric tons of identity preserved, variety specific soybeans.”

Prior to arriving in southern Minnesota, the buyers participated in the Midwest Shippers Conference in Milwaukee, WI. The delegation also spent time at the farms of soybean producers in southeast Minnesota and in northern Minnesota.